The Pros and Cons of Staying vs Moving out during a Renovation

Renovating a space can many times stir up old toxins like asbestos and lead and bring new toxins into your home, which is a huge pro for wanting to move out while renovating. However, moving out can add on to your budget and is an inconvenience. Moving out isn’t always necessary for every project. There are many things that you can do with your contractor to lessen the impact of a renovation. Some include installing drywall that converts toxins and setting up humidifiers. Here are some of the questions to ask your self so you can make an informed decision.

What are you Renovating? 

This is an incredibly important question when deciding if you are going to stay or go. If you are doing a complete gut renovation it will end up taking over your home and contractors suggest moving out. This will speed up the timeline and keep you away from any toxins. 
However, if you are not doing a complete overhaul, staying for most of the renovations is a good medium. Contractors, however, do encourage you to move out during the dusty demolition phase for at least a week so that the dust can settle and they can do a thorough cleaning. 

Can you stretch your budget? 

You should try to know if you are going to be relocating during the renovation as soon as possible. This will allow you to include your other living plans, whether that is a hotel or short term rental charges, in your budget. You could also plan a vacation during the renovation to get you out of the way as well. However, this could backfire if you are planning on keeping constant tabs on the renovation. 

Do you have children or a sensitive adult? 

Lead exposure has a harsher impact on children since their brains are still developing. If your home was built before 1978 it is possible that lead paint was used on the walls. When the paint is disturbed that's when the toxins are released. Your contractor will do a test for lead paint in older homes. When children are involved staying or going carries extra weight since the particles could get in the air or on their hands when they crawl around.  
Toxins can have a range of effects on an adult. If you are immune-compromised from cancer or some other disorder that will make it harder for your body to expel toxins. Asthma sufferers also have a harder time since they are more sensitive to air quality. 

Can you live without a bathroom or kitchen?

If you are renovating a kitchen you need to be prepared to adapt to not having one. This will mean having those extra charges of takeout constantly. Or you can set up a makeshift kitchen in the bathroom with a hot plate, microwave and running water. 
A bathroom renovation can be trickier especially if it is your only bathroom. Sometimes you will be able to use the bathroom before the contractor arrives but there will be a point where the bathroom will be unusable. 

What is the layout of your home? 

This is an important question to think about since you want to separate where you are living from where the work is happening. If there is only one point of entry to your home the contractors will be tracking dust through your space. 
Contractors can do certain things to prevent the spread of dust and toxins through your home. The renovation will be sectioned off with thick plastic and tape. The negative air pressure also stops contaminated air from leaving the renovation zone whenever a worker exits or enters.

How Can I Make My House Childproof?

Being a new parent in your home may seem frightening - and possibly seem unsafe for your newborn or toddler. Here are some childproofing tips by age!

Newborn: At this stage, your baby starts to reflexively bring their hands to their mouth, so begin thinking about choking hazards from an early age.

  1. Make sure your baby's crib adheres to current safety standards as specified by the US Consumer Product Safety Commission
  2. Place baby monitors and their electrical cords at least three feet away from their crib
  3. Install smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors
  4. Anchor TVs and furniture, such as dressers and bookcases
  5. Install a fence around any pool or hot tub
  6. Keep your baby's crib free of pillows, bumpers, stuffed animals and blankets

Crawling: Your crawling baby will grab onto any and everything they can get their hands on. Being as curious as they are, make sure they can only access areas free of danger.

  1. Cover sharp edges on furniture and corners
  2. Remove nightlights in any lower outlets your baby can reach
  3. Cover electrical outlets lower than counter height and select products that are not choking hazards
  4. Keep household cleaners and medicines up high
  5. Ensure stoves are anchored
  6. Pack up and put away valuables

Toddler: Now that your not-so-little baby is walking, running and climbing, it is best to have safety gates installed early so they know which rooms are off-limits. Also remember to give clear reminders of safety, as they cannot remember all the rules at this age.

  1. Be careful with chair and step stools
  2. Install knob covers
  3. Secure doors to off-limit areas, such as cellars and garages
  4. Keep household medications in child resistant containers and in a high cabinet
  5. Create a space out of reach of children for small electronic devices to charge and rest
  6. Place hot foods and liquids on the center of tables and counter tops, not edges, table cloths or placemats